Your 2017 Fun Fitness Trend Forecast

From Poolbiking to Nu-aerobics, here are the new fitness classes you need to know about now

With the New Year upon us, there’s only one sure-fire way to make sure you stick to that all-important exercise regime. And that’s by making it as fun as possible. The industry is bursting with exciting new classes designed to put a spring in your step, quite literally. Let us tell you all about them.

Nu-Aerobics

Inspired by the heart-thumping routines beloved of 80s fitness fanatics, Nu-Aerobics combines a cardio workout with high-octane dance routines to tone muscles. You’ll leave the session having burnt serious calories and with a heady endorphin high that will keep you coming back again and again. Frame Studio was an early pioneer, and its Beyonce Dance Workshops and Rave classes have gained a cult following. While at Seen on Screen Fitness, classes are tiered according to music genre with Diva, Hip Pop and Weekend Medleys to choose from.

The Great Outdoors

Take your keep fit outside. A plentiful supply of fresh air will ensure your skin reaps the rewards of the blood coursing through your veins, and getting closer to nature is always good for the soul. A surge in popularity for ‘Green Exercise’ has seen more outdoor gyms popping up in parks and plenty of indoor gyms are now tailoring traditional classes for an al fresco set up. In South West London, The Outdoor Fitness Collective’s Buggy Fitness class is designed to target post-natal abs and pelvic floor problem areas, mixing cardio and strength training with babies in tow. If it’s tough love you’re after, try the military inspired Tough Mudder Challenge – a gruelling obstacle course that pushes you to your limit.



High-Tech

The wearable tech industry is booming with more of us wanting to see hard evidence and high success rates. With this in mind, we’re seeing a surge in high-tech fitness classes like Orange Theory Fitness – a 60-minute session combining cardio and strength intervals that rely on heart monitors to track exercise intensity and maximise metabolic burn. There will also be a lot more choice in terms of classes available to download or live stream – making it easier than ever before to squeeze exercise into our already crammed calendars. Add to that new apps like Aaptiv and Sworkit that act as your very own virtual personal trainer by creating tailor-made plans.

Back to School

If you’re hankering for the carefree exuberance of the playground then take your exercise back to basics with activities designed to keep you lean and build endurance, all with a heavy dose of nostalgia. The Rabble group focus on team building and strategy sessions so fun-filled you’ll forget you’re working out. Its timetable includes hour-long games such as British Bulldog, Capture the Flag and Stick in the Mud, with rules changing every few minutes to keep you on your toes. For solo sport, try skipping, swimming or sign up to trampolining classes with Jumping Julia – its aerodynamic classes promise to improve your coordination and muscle tone.

Water sports

One failsafe way to optimise your workout is to make some waves. The natural resistance of water ensures you burn more calories and because it’s low impact movement, it’s kinder to your joints. The new Poolbiking craze involves cycling underwater, which not only gives you a good cardio workout but also reduces cellulite and improves skin tone. The hydrostatic pressure of the water generates a continuous palper-rouler movement, giving the body a good lymphatic massage. The Bulgari Spa has introduced an aquatic training series including Water Barre lessons that combine traditional ballet resistance movement with stretching and strengthening intervals. Meanwhile, across the pond, California’s Hotel Del Coronado is hosting 45-minute Mermaid Fitness classes – yes really – for an all-over body conditioning session.

FUEL YOUR WORKOUT Good keep fit begin with good sustenance. As well as your obligatory pre-workout meal, add a GP Nutrition Boost drink to optimise nutrient levels before a session.